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DIY weddings are all the rage and can save you a fortune. If you choose to DIY wedding flowers, be sure to follow these tips from expert florists Claire Kenwood and Harriet Parry...

Everyone knows that weddings can be bank-breakingly expensive, which is why many couples are going DIY-tastic. If you find the idea of this daunting, don’t worry; you don’t need to homespin your entire wedding, but if you take the reins in some areas, you have more to spend on other things. One of the most fun things to do yourself are the flowers: taking on just one aspects of the floral arrangements could save you a sizeable amount. Florists Claire Kenwood and Harriet Parry share their tips for DIY wedding flowers.

Affordable Showstoppers

  1. Remove all of the leaves that will be below the water line. These will make the water dirty and your flowers won’t last as long. Cut all your stems at a diagonal so they drink the maximum amount of water.
  2. Choose a clean vase that is big enough to hold all your flowers and foliage, as they don’t want to be too squashed and want to be seen in their full glory.
  3. Arrange your flowers at varying heights for added interest. Think about what colours and shapes work well together. Cross the stems in the water and turn your vase around to make sure they look lovely from all angles. You could go with just flowers, or add foliage for a different texture.

About Our Florists

Clare Kenward owns a luxury florists in Cambridge; she fell in love with floristry in the 1990s when she was taking some evening classes at the Jane Packer Flower School, but didn’t want to risk leaving her city job. In 2014 she found herself helping a florist for a friend’s wedding; her passion was reignited and she decided to take the plunge. She completed further training at The Cambridge Flower School and opened her own studio.

Harriet Parry studied Fine Art at university, but floristry became something she was naturally drawn to. She started her floristry career working at a central London florist’s, where she found her own floral style and set up Harriet Parry Flowers, focusing on bold and colourful, wild and natural floral designs, curated with a painterly approach.

Image Credits

1. Bouquet https://www.bloomsbythebox.com/blog/diy/maximize-on-diy-flowers-small-wedding-budget/
2. Bouquet, https://www.bloglovin.com/blogs/ruche-3627765/how-to-make-your-own-diy-wedding-bouquet-2272281177
3. Bouquet http://www.photographybykatie.co.uk/
4. Bouquet http://www.wantthatwedding.co.uk/2014/07/29/how-to-create-a-rustic-bridal-bouquet/
5. Centrepiece http://www.wantthatwedding.co.uk/2015/04/04/diy-wedding-workshops-created-by-shoreditch-based-florist-columbia-creative/
6. Centrepiece http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/what-you-need-to-know-about-diy-wedding-flowers-230929
7. Centrepiece http://www.brit.co/tips-to-diy-wedding-flowers/
8. Centrepiece http://www.peppermintlovephotography.com/
9. Confetti http://ninaclairephotography.com/
10. Confetti http://kellyjphotography.co.uk/
11. Confetti https://thedomesticlady.com/about-me/my-wedding/
12. Confetti https://www.etsy.com/uk/listing/110314886/handmade-lace-paper-confetti-cones-x-25?

  1. If they’ve been out of water the end of your flowers can seal and they won’t be able to drink. Cut about 2cm off the bottom of each flower with secateurs or some kitchen scissors before putting them in water.
  2. Flowers need a long drink before being arranged. Whether they’re from your local supermarket, farm gate or back garden, re-cut the stems and leave them for several hours in fresh water to hydrate before arranging them.
  3. The containers you’re putting your flowers in should be clean – scrub it with detergent and hot water. Putting flower food in the water will help prevent bacteria growth with can shorten the life of your flowers. A tiny drop of bleach will do the same job. If your water gets murky – change it and re-cut the stems.

Arranging Tips

If you’re arranging flowers for your wedding, you’ll need to take care to make them looking completely showstopping: follow Harriet’s tips and you won’t put a stem wrong!

  1. Remove all of the leaves that will be below the water line. These will make the water dirty and your flowers won’t last as long. Cut all your stems at a diagonal so they drink the maximum amount of water.
  2. Choose a clean vase that is big enough to hold all your flowers and foliage, as they don’t want to be too squashed and want to be seen in their full glory.
  3. Arrange your flowers at varying heights for added interest. Think about what colours and shapes work well together. Cross the stems in the water and turn your vase around to make sure they look lovely from all angles. You could go with just flowers, or add foliage for a different texture.

About Our Florists

Clare Kenward owns a luxury florists in Cambridge; she fell in love with floristry in the 1990s when she was taking some evening classes at the Jane Packer Flower School, but didn’t want to risk leaving her city job. In 2014 she found herself helping a florist for a friend’s wedding; her passion was reignited and she decided to take the plunge. She completed further training at The Cambridge Flower School and opened her own studio.

Harriet Parry studied Fine Art at university, but floristry became something she was naturally drawn to. She started her floristry career working at a central London florist’s, where she found her own floral style and set up Harriet Parry Flowers, focusing on bold and colourful, wild and natural floral designs, curated with a painterly approach.

Image Credits

1. Bouquet https://www.bloomsbythebox.com/blog/diy/maximize-on-diy-flowers-small-wedding-budget/
2. Bouquet, https://www.bloglovin.com/blogs/ruche-3627765/how-to-make-your-own-diy-wedding-bouquet-2272281177
3. Bouquet http://www.photographybykatie.co.uk/
4. Bouquet http://www.wantthatwedding.co.uk/2014/07/29/how-to-create-a-rustic-bridal-bouquet/
5. Centrepiece http://www.wantthatwedding.co.uk/2015/04/04/diy-wedding-workshops-created-by-shoreditch-based-florist-columbia-creative/
6. Centrepiece http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/what-you-need-to-know-about-diy-wedding-flowers-230929
7. Centrepiece http://www.brit.co/tips-to-diy-wedding-flowers/
8. Centrepiece http://www.peppermintlovephotography.com/
9. Confetti http://ninaclairephotography.com/
10. Confetti http://kellyjphotography.co.uk/
11. Confetti https://thedomesticlady.com/about-me/my-wedding/
12. Confetti https://www.etsy.com/uk/listing/110314886/handmade-lace-paper-confetti-cones-x-25?

  1. English hydrangeas
    CK: Hydrangeas can be expensive when adding them to mixed arrangements but they can be show stoppers on their own. Why not carry a single stem instead of a bouquet? A single head of hydrangeas floating in a vase can look sensational
    HP: these large headed deliver a fantastic volume of colour in a multitude of pinks and greens.
  2. Carnations
    HP: Let’s bring the carnations back! They are exquisite when fully open and are a fab alternative to peonies as they come in a rainbow colour of choices.
    CK: Carnations are highly underrated in my book; they look stunning when used en masse and have a lovely scent. Varieties such as Antigua and Hypnosis are exquisite.
  3. Chrysanthemums
    CK: Like carnations, chrysanthemums are considered old fashioned. However if you look for some of the larger blooms you’ll be surprised at how stunning they can be.
    HP: Chrysanthemum blooms come in amazing varieties, and you could easily be fooled that they are dahlias until closer inspection.
  4. Tulips, Daffodils and Narcissi
    CK: A spring wedding means pocket friendly bulbs. Tulips, daffodils and narcissi are all pocket friendly and smell amazing.
  5. Lisianthus
    HP: These give you an English garden feel thanks to their delicate petals and soft shades; and they have lots of flower heads per stem, which helps your budget stretch further.
    CK: They aren’t particularly cheap but with so many flowers per stem they work out to be quite cost effective. There are some beautiful double varieties that are almost rose like when opened.
  6. Spray Rose
    HP: The spray rose is often a less expensive option to a single stem rose.

Flower Care

Whatever you’ve chosen to do with your flowers, you’ll want to keep them in tip top condition, so follow Claire’s tips and keep them as fresh as a daisy:

  1. If they’ve been out of water the end of your flowers can seal and they won’t be able to drink. Cut about 2cm off the bottom of each flower with secateurs or some kitchen scissors before putting them in water.
  2. Flowers need a long drink before being arranged. Whether they’re from your local supermarket, farm gate or back garden, re-cut the stems and leave them for several hours in fresh water to hydrate before arranging them.
  3. The containers you’re putting your flowers in should be clean – scrub it with detergent and hot water. Putting flower food in the water will help prevent bacteria growth with can shorten the life of your flowers. A tiny drop of bleach will do the same job. If your water gets murky – change it and re-cut the stems.

Arranging Tips

If you’re arranging flowers for your wedding, you’ll need to take care to make them looking completely showstopping: follow Harriet’s tips and you won’t put a stem wrong!

  1. Remove all of the leaves that will be below the water line. These will make the water dirty and your flowers won’t last as long. Cut all your stems at a diagonal so they drink the maximum amount of water.
  2. Choose a clean vase that is big enough to hold all your flowers and foliage, as they don’t want to be too squashed and want to be seen in their full glory.
  3. Arrange your flowers at varying heights for added interest. Think about what colours and shapes work well together. Cross the stems in the water and turn your vase around to make sure they look lovely from all angles. You could go with just flowers, or add foliage for a different texture.

About Our Florists

Clare Kenward owns a luxury florists in Cambridge; she fell in love with floristry in the 1990s when she was taking some evening classes at the Jane Packer Flower School, but didn’t want to risk leaving her city job. In 2014 she found herself helping a florist for a friend’s wedding; her passion was reignited and she decided to take the plunge. She completed further training at The Cambridge Flower School and opened her own studio.

Harriet Parry studied Fine Art at university, but floristry became something she was naturally drawn to. She started her floristry career working at a central London florist’s, where she found her own floral style and set up Harriet Parry Flowers, focusing on bold and colourful, wild and natural floral designs, curated with a painterly approach.

Image Credits

1. Bouquet https://www.bloomsbythebox.com/blog/diy/maximize-on-diy-flowers-small-wedding-budget/
2. Bouquet, https://www.bloglovin.com/blogs/ruche-3627765/how-to-make-your-own-diy-wedding-bouquet-2272281177
3. Bouquet http://www.photographybykatie.co.uk/
4. Bouquet http://www.wantthatwedding.co.uk/2014/07/29/how-to-create-a-rustic-bridal-bouquet/
5. Centrepiece http://www.wantthatwedding.co.uk/2015/04/04/diy-wedding-workshops-created-by-shoreditch-based-florist-columbia-creative/
6. Centrepiece http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/what-you-need-to-know-about-diy-wedding-flowers-230929
7. Centrepiece http://www.brit.co/tips-to-diy-wedding-flowers/
8. Centrepiece http://www.peppermintlovephotography.com/
9. Confetti http://ninaclairephotography.com/
10. Confetti http://kellyjphotography.co.uk/
11. Confetti https://thedomesticlady.com/about-me/my-wedding/
12. Confetti https://www.etsy.com/uk/listing/110314886/handmade-lace-paper-confetti-cones-x-25?

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